Category Archives: Venture Capital & Emerging Growth Practice Area

Introducing the Startup Superhero Video Series! – This Week Featuring Scott Alderton on “Positioning Your Company For Financing”

Stubbs Alderton & Markiles and the Preccelerator Program are proud to announce the launch of their Startup Superhero Video Series – featuring SA&M Attorneys, Preccelerator Mentors, and entrepreneurs on topics specific to entrepreneurship and lessons learned throughout the journey.

This week we’re featuring SA&M Managing Partner Scott Alderton as he chats about “How to Position Your Company for Financing.”  Scott is the Co-Chair of the Venture Capital & Emerging Growth practice at Stubbs Alderton, General Partner of SAM CREATV Ventures, and a thought leader in the startup financing space.

 

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Transcript

Heidi: Tell me a little bit about your practice and experience and what you love most about working with emerging growth companies?

Scott: Sure, I have been doing this for a long time. My practice is broad-ranging. Early on in my career, I was more of a corporate & securities lawyer doing traditional SEC type of work with larger companies. As this thing called the “Internet” began to develop in the ’90s, it looked like it was interesting, I transitioned my practice to being more of a technology and venture capital lawyer. I really like working with companies all along their evolutionary path, but I really like working with early-stage companies. They have diverse, wide-ranging needs, they typically don’t have the resources that large companies have. I feel like I can play a vital role as an advisor even more-so than a lawyer. The lawyering part is the easy job to me, the advising part is really the fun part.

Heidi: Let’s talk a little bit about emerging growth companies and how they approach financing. What are some of the things an early stage company should be thinking about when they are going for funding. If they are really early, how do they attract investors?

Scott: I think it’s really a couple of things. The first thing that every company needs to do is to decide what its vision is and what kind of company it’s going to be. Venture capital is not right for every company and there’s lots of different ways to fund your businesses. The overwhelming majority of businesses do not get funded with venture capital. Venture capital is a way of financing a business through its growth stage. When it has a proven product, when it’s found its market and when it now needs to scale and grow. That’s when venture capital comes in and helps a company do that, but to get to that point is challenging. First you need to decide; am I a company that is going to require venture capital and am I company that is going to address a large scaling market, be disruptive, grow to be very large? That’s a venture fundable business.  Through the early stage, the second thing you need to figure out is  – how am I going to get to the point where professional investors are going to be interested in me? Professional investors are not going to be interested in every company like I said they are going to be interested in companies where they can apply their capital, grow and scale the business.

Heidi: As far as some of the tips that you would give to them, for them to actually attract investors – where do they look for them? Are warm introductions the best thing? What are some of the tactics?

Scott: First of all, don’t look too early. Understand that if you are really going out and seeking traditional, professional investment that you are going to have to have some metrics. You’re going to have to have at least a MVP of a product, you’re going to find a market where that product is being accepted. You are growing and scaling a business in that market. Whether its users or customers – whatever it is – you have to get to that stage first. How do you get to that stage? Well, you get to that stage by raising money from friends and family, from people who know you. From people that are going to invest in you, because you’re the entrepreneur. They believe in you. Relatives, friends, strategic business partners. A second way to look at that is for people who ultimately will be interested in your product, even though you have no metrics or proof of your product today. They will invest in you because they want your product to hit the market. Might be a strategic investment. Figure out a way – come hook or crook-  to raise that initial capital to where you can develop your product. Find a market place and the other doors will open.

Heidi: From a legal and business stand-point, how do they best position themselves?

Scott: Early stage companies by necessity cut corners, right? You don’t have resources. You’re boot strapping. You’re making promises that you can’t fully document. You can’t always afford lawyers or professional advisers and that’s fine. Do not second guess any of that. You got to where you are, but when you reach that point where you are now ready to go out and find professional capital, it’s important to look internally first. That you look at yourself, do the same kind of diligence with yourself that an investor is going to do on you. That way there are no surprises. Figure out capital issues and fix them. Figure out your employment issues and fix them. Figure out your commercial contracts that you have done on a whim and fix them. So that investors don’t look at you and think good concept, but I am not going to take all this risk.

Heidi: There’s another topic that startups tend to think a lot about but aren’t typically fully  educated on – how should they approach valuation and dilution?

Scott: I think that people get hung up on valuation because they have some number set in their mind or they have some experience that they talk about with other entrepreneurs. They think they either have to hang on to a certain percentage of their business or it’s not appropriate to give a certain amount at a certain round. You have to come into a financial transaction with an open mind and understand not just what you’re selling and what you have to give up for that. Also, where you are going and where that money is going to take you? I see entrepreneurs being penny wise and a pound foolish all the time. They think they don’t want to be significantly diluted. They end up throwing a wrench in the negotiation  or they loose a financing deal because they want to hang on to a few points of equity. In reality that money is going to take them so far that they are going to be vast and more valuable. Its a simple proposition of – there’s a pie and you want a piece of that pie. It’s much better to own a smaller piece of a gigantic pie than it is to own a big piece of a small pie.

Heidi: Appreciate you for being here and I’m sure we will have you back for other topics some time soon.

Scott: Thanks, looking forward to it.

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To learn more about our Venture Capital & Emerging Growth Practice, contact Scott Alderton at salderton@stubbsalderton.com.

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Major Legal Pitfalls for Startups – The Case for Hiring a Lawyer before you “Start Up” – Part 2

 

In this two part series, Kelly Laffey discusses the legal pitfalls that startups can avoid when forming their company. Kelly counsels clients on issues related to corporate governance, mergers and acquisitions matters, and securities regulation and compliance. She also assists with financing for large private corporations, and entity formation and succession planning for professional services firms. Kelly provides general business counseling on a variety of up-and-coming regulatory issues for small and emerging companies that offer commercial services, allowing them to explore new business opportunities in various states. Drawing on her diverse work experience in the entertainment arena, including time spent with talent agencies, and music and television production companies, Kelly also assists on matters related to licensing, marketing, and exploitation of intellectual property rights.

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In Part 1 of this series, I described some typical legal problems that startup companies face when they try to go it alone in the early stages of their business related to choice of entity form and jurisdiction and common issues that arise with respect to division of equity.  In this part 2, I discuss issues related to securities laws and intellectual property and finally offer some words of advice regarding how to manage the costs of hiring an attorney early on.

Compliance with Securities Laws

Any issuance of securities, meaning stock, LLC interests, options, warrants, convertible notes, convertible securities (or SAFEs) and more, will be subject to federal and state securities laws.  Startup companies often need to find an exemption to the registration requirements of federal securities laws until they are ready to go public.  Securities law is a large and complex subject that really requires a good corporate attorney to help explain those obligations relevant to a particular company in a particular given circumstance.  Failure to comply with securities laws can result in a huge financial burden on the company, the founders and recipients of equity, including employees and investors, when fines are imposed or the recipients are forced to pay a much higher price for the equity than what was intended.  An experienced securities practitioner can help you find the right exemption and implement the right process to avoid fines and adverse consequences.

Protecting Your Intellectual Property and Employment Issues

It is critical to have proper employment documentation in place and such documentation should properly protect the company’s intellectual property.  Typical employment agreements include “at-will” offer letters, independent contractor agreements, consultant or advisor agreements and stock incentive award documents.  Employment laws vary from state to state so depending on what state you’re in, you may need to include specific provisions to comply with applicable state law. One of the most important employment documents which every employee (including co-founders) should sign is a proprietary or confidential information and inventions assignment agreement.  This document ensures the company’s confidential information will remain confidential and that any ideas, work product or deliverables created by the company’s employees while working for the company will be owned by the company.  These agreements generally prevent key employees who have developed significant intellectual property for the company from claiming rights in such intellectual property in the event that they leave.

Trying To Do It Yourself

For the reasons stated above and many more, one of the biggest mistakes a company can make is trying to do the legal formation work on their own or with an inexperienced legal service provider.  All of the mistakes described above are correctable but correcting them takes time and can incur greater cost than getting professional advice from the beginning.  Many firms have very reasonable startup packages for early stage companies that include both forming the company properly and providing a suite of documents covering most, if not all, of the above issues for the company’s use, for a very reasonable flat fee.  These packages are designed to get the company started and provide you with the basic forms of agreements you need to be protected.  Once these are put in place, the company is unlikely to incur significant legal costs until it raises capital or undergoes another significant event.  While a startup package fee may still seem like a significant amount of money to spend in a company’s early stages, the value is immeasurable over the life and success of the business.

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For more information about Startup Formation and other emerging growth issues, contact Kelly Laffey at klaffey@stubbsalderton.com.

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Major Legal Pitfalls for Startups – The Case for Hiring a Lawyer before you “Start Up” – Part 1

 

In this two part series, Kelly Laffey discusses the legal pitfalls that startups can avoid when forming their company. Kelly counsels clients on issues related to corporate governance, mergers and acquisitions matters, and securities regulation and compliance. She also assists with financing for large private corporations, and entity formation and succession planning for professional services firms. Kelly provides general business counseling on a variety of up-and-coming regulatory issues for small and emerging companies that offer commercial services, allowing them to explore new business opportunities in various states. Drawing on her diverse work experience in the entertainment arena, including time spent with talent agencies, and music and television production companies, Kelly also assists on matters related to licensing, marketing, and exploitation of intellectual property rights.

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In my practice as a corporate attorney, I work primarily with startup and emerging growth companies.  This article may read similar to an advertisement for legal services and there may be some truth to that.  My ultimate goal as an attorney, however, is to save startup companies time and money (and stress) in the long run by doing things right from the start which will allow the company to put more resources to work on growing the business rather than fixing mistakes that could have easily been avoided.

Attorneys are often brought it in to work with clients who have done a significant amount of the formation and organization work themselves or through an online legal service provider at a low cost.  While it is certainly understandable that a very early stage company does not want to incur more legal cost than it has to, what seem like very minor issues to founder can lead to a lot of unnecessary clean-up work and time spent determining the best way to fix those issues including if and how to disclose them to potential investors, strategic partners or others that are critical to the business.

The unfortunate fact is that errors in company formation usually come to light when a company is about to engage in its first major financing or strategic transaction and potential investors or strategic partners start doing their “due diligence” on the company, i.e., looking into its formation documents, the founder agreements, employment agreements, etc.  This is often a critical time for the company as the founders have begun conversations with potential investors or a strategic partner, built momentum and are usually geared to start scaling the business. When the problem areas are identified and those activities are put on hold, it can cause a panic at the company, requiring lawyers to address the errors on a tight timeline in order to minimize the damage and not lose momentum. The result is typically a very high legal bill for a financing or strategic transaction.

In this two-part series, I describe some common legal issues encountered by startups that are not properly considered without legal counsel and which, when thoughtfully discussed with legal counsel prior to forming the company, should spare the company from legal expenses for corrective measures.

Choosing the right entity AND the right jurisdiction for you.

One of the first decisions a new company has to make is what legal entity form to take.  There are without a doubt dozens of articles that say you should be a C-corp for these reasons or you should be an LLC for those reasons.  Maybe you’ve read or know something about S-corps and you think that sounds like a good idea.  The reality is that the right entity form for your company is very specific to the facts and circumstances of your company.  Factors we consider include, among others: How many founders are there? How many employees will the company have? Will the company raise money from VCs or angels (and if so, does it expect to do so right away or will that be much further in the future of the company)? What is the anticipated size of the business? In what industry does the business operate? What might make the most sense now might not serve as the best form later and the form of entity can generally be changed later if necessary.  These are all factors a good lawyer or tax advisor can talk through with a new business and provide guidance regarding which options to select based on the company’s business plans.

The less often thought about issue is where to form the company.  As a lawyer practicing in what’s been termed “Silicon Beach,” most of our clients are based in California and so many assume they should organize or incorporate in California.  For some companies, being formed in California is perfectly fine, however, California can also be problematic for a number of reasons.  Many outside investors do not like to invest in California entities because California does not have the established corporate jurisprudence that Delaware has and so there is an element of unpredictability in California.  Companies will often be advised to incorporate in Delaware because Delaware corporate law is seen as both business and investor friendly.  However, if a company incorporates in Delaware, it has to engage a registered agent located in Delaware and so for some companies, it does not always make sense to pay the registered agent fees. Other factors to consider when choosing a jurisdiction are filing fees, franchise taxes and required annual filings. These are all considerations a corporate lawyer can help startups navigate.

Division of Ownership; Dilution and Vesting.

This can be an awkward conversation amongst founders but it is an important conversation to have early on in the life of the business.  How much of the company should each founder own? What is each founder bringing to the company in terms of skills, resources and service and how do we value what each founder adds? How much dilution are the founders willing to endure and from which sources, i.e., outside investors, an employee option or stock pool, venture debt transactions, etc.? Should the equity be subject to vesting and continued service to the company?

I’ve often encountered very early stage clients who have 2 to 3 initial founders and they have already diluted themselves by giving away equity such that together, they own less than half of the company.  Founders are so passionate and focused on developing the idea and growing the business, they don’t necessarily have good insight when it comes to managing the cap table.  Further, I’ve seen companies provide equity grants to service providers or intended partners of the business without subjecting the grants to vesting or continued service to the company over time.  We typically recommend that all service-related equity vest over a certain number of years to ensure the company is getting the intended value in exchange for that equity.

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For more information about Startup Formation and other emerging growth issues, contact Kelly Laffey at klaffey@stubbsalderton.com.  Stay tuned for Part II of the Startup Pitfalls Series on Monday, October 16th.

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Stubbs Alderton & Markiles Client HouseCanary Announces $31M Series B Financing

HouseCanarySAM client HouseCanary, the leading data analytics and valuation platform for real estate professionals, announced it has closed a $31 million series B funding round, bringing the company’s total funding to $64 million to date.  Investors in the round include PSP Growth, the venture and growth equity arm of PSP Capital, a private investment firm founded by entrepreneur and former Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker, as well as Alpha Edison and other existing investors.

Stubbs Alderton & Markiles, LLP attorneys representing HouseCanary in the transaction were Greg Akselrud and Adam Bagley.

To read the full press release on the financing, click here.

About HouseCanary

Founded in 2014, HouseCanary’s mission is to help people make better real estate decisions. Built on a foundation of great data, powerful models and predictive analytics, the HouseCanary platform aggregates millions of data elements, including more than four decades of property data and a rapidly expanding arsenal of proprietary data calculations and analytics, to accurately define and forecast values and market influences. HouseCanary’s Series A investors include Hillspire (Alphabet Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt’s family office), Alpha Edison, ECA Ventures, Raven Ventures and other top investors including Egon Durban and Nikesh Arora. The company is headquartered in San Francisco. For more information, visit www.housecanary.com.

About Stubbs Alderton & Markiles, LLP

Stubbs Alderton & Markiles, LLP is a business law firm with robust corporate, public securities, mergers and acquisitions, entertainment, intellectual property, brand protection and business litigation practice groups focusing on the representation of, among others, venture backed emerging growth companies, middle market public companies, large technology companies, entertainment and digital media companies, investors, venture capital funds, investment bankers and underwriters. Stubbs Alderton’s clients represent the full spectrum of Southern California business with a concentration in the technology, entertainment, videogame, apparel and medical device sectors. Our mission is to provide technically excellent legal services in a consistent, highly-responsive and service-oriented manner with an entrepreneurial and practical business perspective. These principles are the hallmarks of our Firm. For more information, visit www.stubbsalderton.com

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SAM Preccelerator Announces Seventh Class of Companies

PrecceleratorThe Preccelerator® Program, a Santa Monica, CA based accelerator program for early stage startup companies in the digital media and technology space, announced today that it has added its seventh class of companies featuring four innovative startups.

In 2012 Stubbs Alderton & Markiles launched the first-of-its kind Preccelerator® Program to provide select start-ups with co-working space, mentorship, sophisticated legal services, a full curriculum, user testing sessions, and access to a strategic perks portfolio with the objective of helping grow a founder’s idea from business concept to a funded company. The Preccelerator has 6 month terms, and adds new companies every 3 months for overlapping terms.   Over the past five years, 22 companies have graduated the Program, of which 18 have received funding totaling over $9M.

Preccelerator® Program Class 7 companies include:

nēdl uses proprietary Speech Recognition to let you search within 100,000+ live news, sports, talk, and music broadcast streams to find what you want and listen to the stream or add your unique voice to the global real-time database for instant discovery.  Visit www.findnedl.com

 

Emerging Visual Realities (EVRealities) delivers 360o Video/Virtual Reality content directly to you. Current events and topics that turn our world – captured in VR – are delivered directly to your editorial and content team for licensing. EVRealities’ global creator community streamlines VR content creation and discovery for your editorial team to develop compelling VR stories for daily publication. An EVRealities membership provides full access to our WebVR gallery, delivery of fresh content, and licensing packages. WebVR previews allows your distributed teams to go beyond the thumbnail and experience the emotional composition of content from anywhere in the world, with or without a headset. Visit www.evrealities.com 

LineForLine is a SaaS platform for music promotion that gives artists the ability to share parts of their songs as lyric video clips. These audiovisual snippets of lyrics with sound are intended to be shared as a form of music discovery and promotion. With a growing demand for visual content, the LineForLine team believes these clips are the best way to accomplish their mission of helping people listen and connect to the message of an artist’s music.  Visit www.lineforline.com

Ca$het –  CA$Het is a multi-services platform (MSP) that allows users to identify, curate, and monetize products in movies and TV shows.  We believe that the entertainment industry creates tremendous value by associating characters and products on screen.  The emotional impact created when actors and products interact has been impossible to monetize due to a lack of a suitable mechanism and marketplace.  We aim to change that through our platform. CA$Het provides a mechanism to quickly and accurately identify on screen products while simultaneously creating the marketplace where they can be purchased. (Coming Soon!)

For more information about the Preccelerator® Program, visit www.preccelerator.com

About Stubbs Alderton & Markiles, LLP

Stubbs Alderton & Markiles, LLP is a Southern California based business law firm with robust corporate, public securities, mergers and acquisitions, entertainment, intellectual property, brand protection and business litigation practice groups focusing on the representation of, among others, venture backed emerging growth companies, middle market public companies, large technology companies, entertainment and digital media companies, investors, venture capital funds, investment bankers and underwriters. The firm’s clients represent a broad range of industries with a concentration in the technology, entertainment, videogame, apparel and medical device sectors. The firm’s mission is to provide technically excellent legal services in a consistent, highly-responsive and service-oriented manner with an entrepreneurial and practical business perspective. These principles are the hallmarks of the firm. For more information, visit http://stubbsalderton.com.

About the Preccelerator® Program

The Preccelerator® is a novel platform offered to select start-up companies out of the Stubbs Alderton & Markiles, LLP Santa Monica office that provides interim office space, sophisticated legal services, education, networking, mentorship and $250,000 in usable perks from Google Cloud for Startups, Amazon Web Services, and HubSpot among others, with the objective of helping grow a founder’s idea from business concept to funded startup. The program also retains more than 50 active strategic mentors providing free office hours and discounted services, and provides over 50+ educational workshops and networking events each year. The Program expanded in 2017 to accept a greater number of companies in more formalized classes, depending upon where the companies are in their evolutionary growth, expand benefits to accepted companies, and will look to make strategic investments backed by strategic angel investors. To apply to the Preccelerator, visit www.preccelerator.com/application.

Contact:

Heidi Hubbeling
Chief Operating Officer, Preccelerator® Program
hhubbeling@stubbsalderton.com
310-746-9803

 

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Startup Game Changers Panel – Los Angeles 2017

Startup Game Changers Panel - Los Angeles 2017Startup fundraising can be an arduous journey. Wouldn’t it be easier if you had your own team of guides to help you along your way?

Team startup to the rescue!

Our team of VCs, financial consultants, bankers, and lawyers has collectively helped walk thousands of companies down the fundraising path — from identifying the best funding source to negotiating the best terms.

Now we’d like to share our common wisdom with you, to help take some of the pain and confusion out of the fundraising process.

Friday, August 4, 2017 from 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM

Join us for this 2-hour session during which we’ll cover:

  • The process of a raise
  • Pre-money and post-money valuation
  • Understanding dilution
  • Negotiating your best VC deal
  • Term sheets: what you need to know
  • And more!

Our distinguished panelists for this event are:

Moderator: Caroline Cherkassky, Stubbs Alderton & Markiles, LLP

Panelists: 
Peter Moon, Square 1 Bank
Chris Fitzjarrald, Trinet
Rudy Barthelemy, Early Growth Financial Services
Doug Sills, Moonshots Capital
Frank Grant, Interstate VC
Alex Rubalcava, Stage Venture Partners
Virginia  Schmitt, B Capital Group

Come prepared to ask questions, to network, and to learn how to take your startup to the next level.

Brought to you by:

 

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SAM Client Consortia Health Secures $2 Million in Financing

Consortia HealthStubbs Alderton & Markiles’ client Consortia Health Holdings, Inc., a Personalized Pelvic Wellness health care company that provides clinically-relevant individualized diagnosis, therapy and education to help physicians treat their patients with incontinence, pelvic pain, sexual dysfunction and other pelvic disorders, today announced that it has closed a $2 million preferred round of financing. The round was led by Ponil Ventures, a current investor, and included Golden Seeds and Belle Michigan as new investors. The new financing will fund the growth needed to assist Consortia Health as they continue building the leading Pelvic Wellness Company.

To read the full article about Consortia Health click here.

Stubbs Alderton attorneys representing Consortia Health in this matter were Caroline Cherkassky and Sean Greaney.

About Consortia Health
Consortia Health Holdings, Inc., is a personalized medicine company providing an integrated delivery model in partnership with physicians to provide diagnosis, treatment, and educational support to address pelvic floor disorders including urinary incontinence, pelvic pain and sexual health. Consortia Health is a leading provider of these services in the US and has been a trusted partner transforming patient lives. Consortia Health is focused on three strategic imperatives: becoming the worldwide leader in clinical continence services, expanding into the assisted living market and diversifying by offering a product portfolio while increasing revenue from international expansion. For more on how Consortia Health is making a difference, please visit the Company’s website at www.ConsortiaHealth.com.

For more information about our Venture Capital and Emerging Growth Practice , contact Scott Alderton at salderton@stubbsalderton.com

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SAM Client Colle Capital Partners Receives Strategic Investment from Zain Group to Close Out Fund

Colle Capital Stubbs Alderton & Markiles client Colle Capital Partners, a global, opportunistic, early stage technology venture fund based in New York, with a presence in San Francisco, has closed its fund, after a strategic investment by Zain Group, a leading innovator of mobile communications in eight markets across the Middle East and Africa. Colle Capital Partners has a diversified technology focus with an emphasis on data in the Energy, Media, Telecommunications, Health IT, Security, and Software Development sector.

To read the full press release visit here.

Stubbs Alderton attorneys representing and acting as Fund Counsel to Colle Capital Partners are  Scott Alderton and Jonathan Friedman.

About
Colle Capital Partners is a global, opportunistic, early stage technology venture fund. Managers have completed deals in various verticals and across all capital structures. They pay special attention to data. Virtually all their deals have intrinsic relationship with data as they believe that data will drive future growth for all their companies.

For more information about our Venture Capital and Emerging Growth Practice , contact Scott Alderton at salderton@stubbsalderton.com

 

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Scott Alderton Featured in Built In LA Article

Built In LAStubbs Alderton & Markiles’ Partner Scott Alderton was featured on Built In LA this week giving his expert opinion on essential legal advice for early-stage startups.

To find some of the answers to your most difficult startup-related questions, read the full article on Built in LA here. 

Scott Alderton is a founding partner of the Firm, Managing Partner, and a member of the Firm’s Executive Committee. Scott is co-chair of the Firm’s Venture Capital and Emerging Growth Practice Group and chair’s the Firm’s Interactive Entertainment and Video Games Group. Scott advises both public and private clients across a number of industries, including technology, manufacturing and distribution of goods in commerce, finance, the Internet, interactive video games, and new media industries.

To learn more about Stubbs Alderton & Markiles, LLP contact Scott Alderton at salderton@stubbsalderton.com

For more about the Preccelerator® Program, contact Heidi Hubbeling, COO at
(310) 746-9803 or hhubbeling@stubbsalderton.com

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Stubbs Alderton & Markiles and CREATV Media Featured in L.A Biz Article Regarding Preccelerator Expansion

Stubbs Alderton & Markiles and CREATV Media were featured in a L.A. Biz Article outlining the two firms’ strategic alignment to grow the Preccelerator Program and seek out potential investments in promising startup companies in the digital media and technology space.

To view the full article, click here.

For more information about the Preccelerator Program, contact Heidi Hubbeling at hhubbeling@stubbsalderton.com or (310) 746-9803.

 

 

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